8 ways new motherhood has prepared you for self-isolating

Because you have been kind of doing it for the last six months but just calling it ‘normal life with a baby’…

1. You know to do an at-home date night, as you haven’t been out alone in two years 

…Possibly a slight exaggeration. But still. Being new parents means that most of your alone time with your partner is done at home.

You know your takeaway order, your favourite supermarket wine and exactly which flavour of Ben and Jerry’s will hit the spot on a stressful day. (And let’s face it, they’re all stressful days in the midst of coronavirus, so banish all ice-cream guilt until it’s over.)

2. You and your friends are experts at virtual socialising

You and your mum friends meet up at soft plays/coffee shops. But a lot of your contact is done from your sofa.

When you can’t get to see your pals for dinner out or quick drink often due to childcare issues/being too exhausted to put your shoes on after 7pm, you get very used to WhatsApp, FaceTime and Skype catch-ups.

So lean on your friends when you’re self-isolating. Send positive messages on your NCT WhatsApp group. Cheer your mates up. Drink the tea and do a virtual cheers. It’ll help.

For more options on apps, take a look at our article about the top tech that can keep you connected.

3. Pyjamas are already daytime clothes to you

Yes, and you won’t hear any different. Self-isolating may mean getting used to ditching make-up and heels for some and getting used to a new temporary life of slipper socks and joggers. For you, that’s already your new mum aesthetic and your selection of jogging bottoms/pyjamas/onesies is good to go.

4. Your Netflix watch list is a well thought-out thing of beauty

Ok, so most of the time you’re too tired to watch anything other than a Friends repeat again anyway. But still! It’s there, in theory.

5. You can live an entire life from your laptop

The faff of piling a child into a car seat for a supermarket shop means your supermarket delivery standard order is already filed and ready to click.

You’re all set for this.

You haven’t been to a real life clothes shop since the toddler-based whoops-we-accidentally-stole-a-handbag incident of 2018.

Takeaway apps are your bible. Your favourite bloggers are bookmarked. Your podcasts are downloaded. You’re all set for this.

6. Home is your zone

When you spend as much time in four walls as you do with a newborn, you tend to value comfort there. And to make it your personalised cosy zone.

So more than likely you already have the softest cushions, best blankets, a good bottle of bath oil and a fleet of hot water bottles. And now’s the time to throw as much comfort as you can at the situation.

7. Exercising outside is the only way you know how

Planning to get to a gym/class is pretty hard to do as a new mum. And a lot of it is trickier when you’re pregnant.

But what you do know, as a pregnant woman or mum, is walking, walking, walking.

So as per government advice that even when self-isolating we can still exercise, as long as it’s at a distance to people, get that pram out and pound those pavements. It’ll help you physically and mentally, when times are challenging.

Here’s more on keeping fit while self-isolating and pregnant, and with a baby.

8. You’re well up on all things local

Maternity leave is a lesson in discovering what’s on your doorstep or accessible when you only have half an hour before naptime.

More than likely you have some local mum friends that will drop you an emergency pizza on the doorstep if you need. And that you follow all your local hubs on Instagram so you know who’s offering what in terms of delivery/stock/services. Knowledge is power. Knowledge is also the number for that Indian that does the incredible samosas.

Support and information

Coronavirus has thrown up so many questions for pregnant women and new parents. We’ve compiled this FAQ so you have reliable information and support when you need it

Interactive, engaging and social, our live online antenatal course is a great way for you to meet other local parents, and get essential unbiased information and knowledge about pregnancy, birth and early days with your baby.

Our branch volunteers are running online groups and activities, if you need some company or a chat. Visit our local events page and enter your postcode to find out what’s happening in your area.

Read the NHS advice on what you should do when you’re self isolating to try and prevent passing on the virus to other people at home.

Our support line offers practical and emotional support with feeding your baby and general enquiries for parents, members and volunteers: 0300 330 0700.